Substance-Exposed Newborns    refers to infants who have been exposed to drugs, tobacco, or alcohol in-utero                                            

Each year, an estimated 400,000 –440,000 infants (10–11% of all births) are affected by prenatal alcohol or illicit drug exposure. Prenatal exposure to alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs has the potential to cause a wide spectrum of physical, emotional, and developmental problems for these infants. The harm caused to the child can be significant and long-lasting, especially if the exposure is not detected and the effects are not treated as soon as possible.

Did You Know?

Remember to visit our Resources pages to learn more about prenatal substance exposure, FASD, and/or to locate treatment and support resources.

Click the title above to learn more about how drinking durging alcohol pregnancy can lead to long-term effects for the infant at risk.

 

FASD stands for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and encompasses several disorders that can arrise from a mother drinking during pregnancy. Effects can include physical, as well as behavioral and learning disabilities

Click the title above to learn more about how using tobacco during pregnancy can lead to long-term effects for the infant at risk.

 

Smoking is not only bad for the mother's health but can also make it harder for a woman to get pregnant and more likely for the mother to have a miscarriage, premature birth, or other negative long-term effects on the infant

Click the title above to learn more about how even taking prescription medications such as opioids during pregnancy can have an effect on the infant at risk.

 

It is critical for physicians to consult with women of child-bearing age or a woman who is pregnant prior to prescriping opioid medications. This conversation is necessary to weigh the risks and benefits of the medication and the infant's health.

Click the title above to learn more about how taking drugs such as amphetemines and marijuana, whether prescribed or illegal, and other illegal drugs such as cocaine can lead have an effect on the infant at risk.